Paul Ryan Is Too Little, Too Late With Zika Virus House Bill

As House Republicans announce its $662 million Zika virus bill today, it falls short only ONE-THIRD of the $1.9 billion request of what the Center for Disease Control (CDC) needs to fight the global health emergency.

We are learning more information every day about the danger and spreading of the Zika virus beyond its effect on pregnant women but to the general population. And the CDC admits they don’t have the resources necessary to fight the mosquito-borne disease. President Obama has already transferred $589 million set aside for Ebola prevention to prepare for Zika, but now House Republicans want to raid more from that fund–still falling short of what CDC needs–to combat this impending public health disaster.

What is it going to take for Paul Ryan and the House Republicans to understand what’s at stake?

House Republicans Are Putting The Public At Risk By Failing To Act on Zika Virus
Health Officials Said […]

Read more after the jump.

What The Kochs Consider “Common Sense” Means More Health Risks For Americans

Increased risk of asthma attack, bronchitis, cardiovascular disease and, yes, premature death: These are some of the adverse health effects that the EPA cites in their call for mercury emissions regulations. But the Kochs continually disregard health risks to protect their profits.

In 2012, according to the U.S. Senate Lobbying Disclosure Act Database, Koch Companies Public Sector – the lobbying arm of the brothers’ corporate empire – spent three out of four quarters lobbying on a resolution for the Senate to formally disapprove of the EPA’s MATS standards. So it comes as no surprise that the Koch-allied think tank, the Cato Institute, spiked the proverbial football after the Supreme Court ruled against the EPA’s MATS emission regulations in State of Michigan vs. EPA today.

In their press release Cato says the Supreme Court’s decision is a “clear victory for common sense.” How convenient that “common sense” rules in favor of their billionaire benefactors as well as the amicus brief that Cato submitted on Michigan’s behalf.

Read more after the jump.